Goodbye 2016 – It’s About Time…Just Like This Post Is

spiral clock time

We are about to say goodbye to 2016, and like this post, it’s about time. For some, it’s good riddance. For others, it may have been a great year that their sorry to see go. New Year’s Eve is nothing more than a date on a calendar marking the transition of one measurement to another. That is all that time really is – a unit of measurement. So why do we treat it like it’s much more than that?

What is Time?

Go to work and ask your colleagues what time is. I’m certain you’ll get a myriad of responses, and few of them will remotely resemble the actual definition of the word.


Miriam-Webster defines time as:

a :  the measured or measurable period during which an action, process, or condition exists or continues :  duration

b :  a nonspatial continuum that is measured in terms of events which succeed one another from past through present to future


Time is an abstract concept, but one we all understand. Our lives are defined by it. From measuring our age to the period we work, time is an important part of each and every day for most people. Maybe that’s why we treat it as if it was a physical object instead of a unit of measure.

Monetizing Time

money and hourglassWe need oxygen, water, food, and shelter to survive. They are among our basic needs. However, there is another in modern society, and I don’t mean a smart phone with a good wi-fi connection: money. We value money, and some among us place too high a value on it. Regardless, it explains why so many functions of time can also be attributed to money.

Think about it: you spend time do things you love or hate. Spending is a financial concept, as is saving. When you do two things at once, or group errands into a logical order, you are attempting to save time.

What happens when things don’t go as planned? Delays and mistakes often costs us time. Remember all those hours you spent pursuing some worthwhile goal? Congratulations, you were investing your time wisely.

Time the Precious Commodity

Yes, we treat it as a physical object – or at least something we know we don’t have a limitless supply of. Think of the colloquialisms surrounding time. When you aren’t in a rush, you take your time. Of course, go too slow and you run out of time causing you to need more of it.

There are moments when we ignore the value of the minutes and hours we have on earth. We do things sometimes to pass the time. We can also waste time, or run into a problem that causes us to. We plan ahead to avoid being pressed for time, but to get things right, sometimes we have to stall for time. Regardless of whether or not we live to be 100, everyone will someday wish they just had a little more time.

Time and Our Daybed time clock

Time is so valuable and that we define our very lives by it. We may have had a great time or a rough time last night, or last year. Was 2016 the time of your life or a time to forget?

The definitions vary, but each of us has a bed time, dinner time, and some relaxation time. We carve out our schedules for some family time, of in rare circumstances, me time.

The Value of Time

With so much emphasis on time, why do we abuse it so? If life on this earth is finite, and the clock ticking to our deaths never stops for a time out, why do we waste a single moment of it?

Many people believe in New Year’s resolutions. I have never been a huge proponent of them, because if something is worth doing, it’s not worth waiting to start.

This year, we should all make one.

Pledge to spend more time on the things you love. Take time out of your day to be kind. Invest your time in making yourself a better person. Don’t waste time on things you can’t control. Use you time to live your life to the fullest. Pass the time doing things you enjoy.

The clock is ticking. Before you know it, we’ll all be out of time. What will you say about your time here when it’s over?

I wish you all a very happy 2017!

Happy New Year 2017

About Mikael Carlson

Mikael Carlson is the award-winning political fiction author of The iCandidate and the Michael Bennit Series of political dramas. He has also written the thriller The Eyes of Others. His current series, The Black Swan Saga, are epic dystopian political thrillers that showcase a world of corporate governance dominated by elitists. The first two novels, America, Inc. and America, Inc.: Bounded Rationality are available now. He lives in Danbury, CT.

About MikaelCarlson 27 Articles
Mikael Carlson is the award-winning political fiction author of The iCandidate and the Michael Bennit Series of political dramas. He has also written the thriller The Eyes of Others. His current series, The Black Swan Saga, are epic dystopian political thrillers that showcase a world of corporate governance dominated by elitists. The first two novels, America, Inc. and America, Inc.: Bounded Rationality are available now. He lives in Danbury, CT.

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